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Between and Mortarboard


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Results for terms:insignias (devices)

8 UMMA Objects (page 1/1)
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This Hemba <em>adze</em>, or chief’s ceremonial ax, is decorated with an elegantly carved female head upon the end of its smooth handle while an iron blade has been lodged into its oval base. This <em>adze</em> exhibits the characteristic hallmarks of a Southern Hemba style, which in turn was strongly influenced by the neighboring Luba. The head bears an elongated, oviod-shaped face, a wide convex forehead, coffeebean-shaped eyes within ocular recesses, a triangular nose, and full lips. An elaborate pulled-back hairstyle in the form of a chignon (<em>kibanda</em>), features a cruciform motif. Four brass tacks that have been inserted into the extreme top, bottom, left and right points of the face echo this crucifix shape.
Hemba (Hemba (culture or style))
Prestige Adze
1875 – 1885
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.225
This  stool features an elegantly carved standing female caryatid supporting the seat. It exhibits the characteristic hallmarks of a Southern Hemba style, which in turn was strongly influenced by the neighboring Luba. These traits include the broad, rounded forms of the sculpture, the disproportionately large head, the ovoid face with a subdued expression, a wide convex forehead, the brow ridge defined in relief, half-closed eyes, the elongated nose, the narrow mouth with clenched lips, the protruding abdomen with a pointed umbilicus, scarification patterns on the torso, and a multitude of sculpted bracelets upon both wrists.  Also emblematic of Southern Hemba sculptural forms is the elaborate pulled-back chignon hairstyle (<em>kibanda</em>), which forms a cruciform motif in the rear.  The figure also possesses conical breasts, short squat legs, and flat feet. The tips of the figure’s fingers symbolically carry the circular seat.
Hemba (Hemba (culture or style))
Chief's Stool
1915 – 1925
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.224
This wooden mortar is decorated by finely carved geometric patterns and features two anthropomorphic heads bearing recognizable Chokwe characteristics including coffeebean-shaped eyes enclosed in large ocular cavities. The lower head, the face of an idealized female (<em>mwana pwo</em>), forms the body of the mortar. The upper head, turned at a 90 degree angle from the lower head, is wearing a headdress which extends behind his face. Resting on top of the upper head is the bowl of the mortar.
Chokwe (Chokwe (culture or style))
Mortar
1865 – 1875
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.205
The pipe consists of a long, curved stem, a bone mouthpiece, and a bowl delicately sculpted in the form of a male head. Rectangular ears protrude sideways, while a curved chin and inverted T-shaped nose jut forward. Geometric designs characteristic of Kuba carving adorn the face, neck, and coiffure. A number of brass tacks stud the pipe, and fine copper wire has been carefully wound around the stem. Camwood powder, highly prized throughout Central Africa, has been added to its surface.<br /><br />
Reference:<br />
Maurer, Evan M. and Niangi Batulukisi.  <em>Spirits Embodied:  Art of the Congo, Selections from the Helmut F. Stern Collection</em>.  Minneapolis:  The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, 1999.
Kuba (Kuba (Democratic Republic of Congo style))
Pipe
1895 – 1905
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.208A&B
This Mangbetu ivory horn features a sculpted, highly schematic human head with an elongated neck at its extremity. The horn’s reddish coloration could be the result of the addition of pigment such as tukula (camwood) powder or the application of palm oil. The discoloration seen under the mouthpiece was due to wear caused by a fiber cord from which the instrument was suspended.
Mangbetu (Mangbetu)
Oliphant
1855 – 1865
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.235
This small Pende ivory pendant (<em>ikhoko</em>) depicts a delicately carved male head. Stylistically, <em>ikhoko</em> bear many of the facial characteristics of anthropomorphic Pende <em>mbuya</em> masks, after which they have been modeled. In this particular example, an ovoid head rests atop a conical neck and features a spiked, crown-like coiffure, a large, bulbous forehead, a V-shaped brow, laterally protruding ears, heavily lidded and downcast eyes, an up-turned nose, a wide mouth, and a slightly pointed chin. Circular motifs decorate the top of the forehead and the neck. The pendant also possesses a pale yellow patina, possibly from contact with tukula powder.
Pende (Pende)
Amulet Pendant
1925 – 1935
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.197
This small Pende ivory pendant (<em>ikhoko</em>) depicts a delicately carved male head. Stylistically, <em>ikhoko</em> bear many of the facial characteristics of anthropomorphic Pende <em>mbuya</em> masks, after which they have been modeled. In this particular example, the pendant feature an ovoid head, a tall coiffure, a large, bulbous forehead, heavily lidded, closed eyes from which vertical lines extend downward, a wide, up-turned nose, and a pointed chin. Three bands of fine decorative motifs adorn the top of the forehead. The pendant also possesses a pale yellow patina.
Pende (Pende)
Amulet Pendant
1875 – 1885
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.198
This small Pende ivory pendant (<em>ikhoko</em>) depicts a delicately carved male head. Stylistically, <em>ikhoko</em> bear many of the facial characteristics of anthropomorphic Pende <em>mbuya</em> masks, after which they have been modeled. In this particular example, an ovoid head rests atop a columnar neck and features a tall, striated coiffure.  It has a large, bulbous forehead, a V-shaped brow, heavily lidded and downcast eyes, an up-turned nose, a wide oval mouth, and a slightly pointed chin. Fine patterns and lined motifs decorate the neck. The pendant also possesses a pale yellow patina.
Pende (Pende)
Amulet Pendant
1915 – 1925
Gift of Candis and Helmut Stern
2005/1.199
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