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Between and Mortarboard


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Results for terms:circuit boards

14 UMMA Objects (page 1/2)
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This print has a large panel in the center with a grid pattern in dark blue, orange, green and pink. It is bordered on the left and right by a grid of tiny dark blue dots on a light blue background and a vertical band of dark blue dashes. At the top, there are two rows of small dark blue squares on a light blue background, and a single dark blue band above it. At the base, there is text in light blue on a dark blue panel, which reads: "MEMORY MATRIX. MEMORY CAPACITY - The amount of information which a memory unit can store. See Capacity. MEMORY, CORE - See Core Memory. MEMORY CYCLE - An operating consisting of reading from and writing into memory. MEMORY DUMP - A process / of writing the contents of memory consecutively in such a form that it can be examined for computer or program errors. MEMORY, EXTERNAL - See External Memory. MEMORY FILL - Placing a pattern of characters in the memory registers not in use / in a particular problem, to stop the computer if the program, through error, seeks instructions take
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
Memory Matrix
1967
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.11.1
A very colorful print with a variety of panels, large and small, and overlapping, filled with designs of various types: stripes, checkers, grids, diamonds, circles, abstract shapes, circuit boards, etc. At the bottom left, in the print, there are two sets of text. One is black and white and reads: "1 pyramide in form einer achtelskugel". The second is in white on a blue and green striped background and reads: "PYRAMIDE IN FORM EINER ACHTELSKUGEL -- JUNE 1967". Print is dediated, signed, and dated (l.c.) "For Diane Kirkpatrick -- Eduardo Paolozzi A/P 1967" in pencil.
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
7 pyramide in form einer achtelskugel
1967
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.11.6
This colorful print has an all-over design of grids, checkers and boxes. The many colors in this print include: red, black, yellow, green, magenta, tan, blue, purple, and orange.
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
Similar remarks apply to Uranium 235
1965 – 1970
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.14.18
This print is monochromatic, in a dark blue, and shows an image of a parrot, created out of computer parts. Just the chest and head of the mechanical parrot are visible and the bird faces to the right of the print. Below this image is a design showing the movements of pistons at four moments in their cycle. The print is signed and dated by the artist in pencil (l.r.) "Eduardo Paolozzi A/P 1965/70".
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
Will Man desert the Dog for the Dolphin?
1965 – 1970
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.14.24
This print is in a series of colors: silver, black, three shades of purple, pink, tan, orange, and yellow. There are a series of bands with different background designs, mainly stripes, that are overlayed with shapes: triangles, hexagons, and trapezoids. At the base of the print, there is a pink band with text that reads: "COMPUTER - EPOCH. Another datum, the sound - integration of exactly 70 unimodulary equivalent flaite groups, linear operations with coefficients. A third element in theory is based on the dialectic of identity. The yes or no of the borderzone [<em>sic.</em>] developes an identical / transformation of information over the entire chains of cells. Ambivalence between optical isolation of form and openess in structuring while the stream of sub - atomic energy dribbles out. Each epoch is the static instantaneous picture of a process. This represents a / standstill of becoming not a static end, a condition of pluralism. / JUNE 1967" . Print is dedicated, signed and dated in pencil (l.r.) "For Dia
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
Computer-Epoch
1967
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.11.8
This screenprint has a series of horizontal lines in pink, orange, green, grey, tan, black, and blue. At the top, there is a grid design in black, tan and white. There is a band of figures at the bottom with images of Mickey and Minnie Mouse. Below, there is a band of colored hexigons and a band of dark pink with white text, which reads: "horizon of expectation". The problem 'Which comes first, the solid. The fashioning power, that has not contained in R*. In the first case we choose Z for A and thus get R* = B. In the second case we may also write the second line in the form (2<em>ˆ</em>1) Z T1, ..., from the dialectical usage. / almost an example of painted philosophy. Thus, the result of these pictures we can carry on a dialogue. fore T = ASi. Consequently the order of B is Zb, half of its operations are proper forming the group T the other half are improper, the coloring serves the visualization of form. The / colored border unconscious expectations, these CtT(a) + CtF(a) = Ct(a) no ve ní, vune ne vea ní.
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
Horizon of Expectations
1967
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.11.3
This colorful, horizontally-oriented print has three main scenes: one vertical on the right, and two stacked horizontal scenes on the left. On the right, there are a series of colored arrows that start in the top corners and move down, coming together through a red and green checkered ring, and then separated back out through white bands to each side. In the top left scene, there is a photo of a person in a car; the car's back "suicide door" is open. On the bottom left, there is a photo of a circuit board above a series of squares and checkers at the base.
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
Totems and Taboos of the Nine-to-Five Day
1965 – 1970
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.14.19
Very colorful print with a series of colored bands, separated with black lines, at the top. Below the rainbow-colored bands are three fragmented images of the head of the Disney character Goofy, in teal, pink, yellow and white. The main portion of the print below has a series of differently organized and vibrantly colored grids and square patterns. At the base, there is an olive colored box, outlined in black, with black text reading: "Protocol-Sentences' the most adequate cosmological symbol centricity and radial arrangements organized, as a rule, according to quaternary point p a point would in turn give rise to yet more neutrons until a veritable avalanche developed: [mathematical equation] / [mathematical equation] .... The mathematical implications of the process are quite explicit. A pound of uranium contains some needs. With this desideratun [<em>sic</em>] in mind, transfers from one setttlement to another will be made on an exchange basis, or refers to "the nullity of forms" and other normalizing / fa
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
Protocol-Sentences
1967
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.11.4
Very colorful print with a series of panels, each with a different design. Some panels are just colorful patterns, while others have recognizable objects. At the top, there is a pink rondel with a photograph of a satellite over earth. Next to the rondel, there are five planes (three black and two white), alternating in direction. At the center of the image to the left, there is a panel with an image of a stuffed cat, clown, lemur, and bunny. At the bottom of the print, there is a series of cubes made up of tan grids that end, at the right, in a rainbow-colored bulls eye. Below this, there is text in black that reads, "SUN CITY. Normally An Kae Plaza, the official destination of the 30 - odd bar - brothels is a rollicking but strictly - policed mayhem. The garishly - painted bars, with their backroom "boom - boom emporiums" have been built on three sides of the concrete clock square. / Military police patrol the area checking passes and I.D. cards. Never ending vapour trails of giant cargo transports criss cro
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
Sun City
1967
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.11.7
This photolithographic print in neon blue, purple and pink has a variety of scenes. At the top left is an image of an orangutan dressed up as a human pilot and holding a in-flight magazine. Right below this are two copies of the same image of a woman's headshot with small illegible text at the bottom right; the right image is slightly blurred. To the right of these scenes, at the top is a Mondrian-type image and below it are a series of circuits. At the bottom, there is a photograph of two small children playing with blow-up toys in a blow-up swimming pool. 
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
Transparent Creatures Hunting New Victims
1965 – 1970
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.14.1
This colorful print is divided horizontally into three main sections. At the top, there are a series of horizontal bands, two with a red background and black and tan grids, respectively, and one with light and dark pink bands with rondels with colorful motifs inside. The center section is mostly pink with a dot-matrix of figures and partial figures, for example, a slice of pie, a child's face. Below this, a series of horizontal bands are overlayed with white, gridded boxes with colors in the voids. The last section at the base has a bright red background and an irregular black grid and text in black below, including the title of the print. The print is signed and dated in pencil (l.r.) "Eduardo Paolozzi A/P 1967".
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
Spontaneous Discrimination Non-Spontaneous Discrimination
1967
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.11.5
This colorful print has a series of elements organized into horizontal registers. At the top is an orange band with black text that reads, "A FORMULA THAT CAN SHATTER INTO A MILLION GLASS BULLETS.  The result is tax free Walt Disney in skill, but much cheaper in cost. And one ingenious programmer did manage to make the computer draw pictures of Mickey Mouse's head as seen from any chosen direction. He showed 100 people an / original Mondrian drawing and a drawing made by the computer in the style of Mondrian. He asked them to decided which drawing was artistically better, and which was produced by a machine. The unique solution will be given next month.". Below this is a register of boxes with traces of circuitry. <br /><br />
Then there is a band made of a pink grid, with white boxes with colors filling the space. Below is a large tan section with colorful gridded shapes in pink, orange, and green or green, purple, blue and aqua. Next is a Mondrian-like grid in white, orange, blue and red. Then, there is a s
Sir Eduardo Paolozzi (British (modern))
A formula that can shatter into a million glass bullets
1967
Gift of Professor Diane M. Kirkpatrick
2000/2.11.2
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