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Results for terms:brass (alloy)

6 UMMA Objects (page 1/1)
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This rice bowl, or <em>jubal</em>, has a flat base. Normally, such rice bowls are classified into three different sizes: large, medium-sized and small. Their shapes are almost identical.<br />
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<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 250]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.305
These are <em>jubal</em>, a type of bowl used for serving steamed rice and often also called a <em>sabal</em>. The upper surfaces of the lids of these bowls are decorated with incised lines. Their bases are flat, without feet. The shapes of bowls follow regional characteristics. In northern provinces, rims curve inwards, and bowls are relatively short. In southern provinces, the walls stand almost straight, while bowls themselves are relatively tall.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 249]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Brass Bowl with Incised Circles
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.308A&B
These are <em>jubal</em>, a type of bowl used for serving steamed rice and often also called a <em>sabal</em>. The upper surfaces of the lids of these bowls are decorated with incised lines. Their bases are flat, without feet. The shapes of bowls follow regional characteristics. In northern provinces, rims curve inwards, and bowls are relatively short. In southern provinces, the walls stand almost straight, while bowls themselves are relatively tall.<br />
&nbsp;
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 249]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Brass Bowl with Protruding Sides
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.307A&B
Brass is an alloy of copper and tin. Brassware objects generally include ritual bowls, tableware for aristocrats, incense burners, braziers, and spoons. The UMMA collection does not include a complete set of dining or ritual implements but individual items including four water bowls (daejeop ), five rice bowls (jubal ), seven kimchi bowls (bosigi ), six side-dish bowls (jaengcheop ), one sauce dish (jongji ), and four spoons. It is assumed that these items were produced during the modern era. All of them were formerly part of the Bruce Hasenkamp collection.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 248]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Brass Serving Spoon (one of a pair)
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.306.1
This type of bowl, with an inverted rim and hollow inside, is known as an <em>okbari</em> or <em>omok-bansanggi</em> (concave tableware). Considering its size, it was probably used for serving steamed rice. The tall foot was made separately before being attached. One line is incised around the outer rim of the bowl, which gently slopes inwards. The nipple-shaped handle is fixed to the top of the lid by a nail. The head of a nail joining the foot to the base of the bowl is visible on the indented base of the foot.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 249]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Covered Bowl
1600 – 1899
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.304A&B
Wall clock in the shape of a cut out asterisk, with wide black hour/minute hands and red second hand.
George Nelson (American (North American))
2213 (Asterisk)
1948 – 1958
Gift of Dr. Seymour and Barbara K. Adelson
2015/2.9
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