113 UMMA Objects
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Matte finish bottle. It is black with tan colorations with circular rings around the top.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bottle
Gift of Margaret Condon Taylor in honor of Professor Kim Young Sook
2014/2.105
Glossy finish gray colored bowl. Contains a ring near the rim on the inside and an indentation in the center.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Celadon Bowl
Gift of Margaret Condon Taylor in honor of Professor Kim Young Sook
2014/2.106
A large rectangular rounded metal bar lock, similar to a u-bar lock, meant to use as a lock for a chest.<br />
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Pipe-shaped locks such as these were used for locking boxes and chests. Their keys have been lost. Each of their bodies was made by forging two plates before soldering them together.
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017), 246]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Lock for Chest
1850 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.62
A tall ceramic bowl with an inward-sloping lip, making the opening smaller than the width of the bowl. Has an accompanying matching lid.<br />
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This yellow, low-fired earthenware vessel consists of a body and a lid. It is made from fine clay mixed with a small amount of fine sand particles. Fine, incised horizontal lines run around the body. The gallery that supports the lid rests at a slight incline, and the vessel mouth slopes slightly inwards. The lower part of the body rapidly tapers inwards before joining the base, the center of which is indented. The lid features a low, flat knob. The round, upper part of the lid meets the lip at a slight angle.[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 45]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bowl
400 – 599
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.75A
This lotus medallion design on this round tile-end consists of eight petals. The outer rim is decorated with eighteen round dents. The seedpod contains six peripheral seeds.<br />
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This gray, high-fired earthenware convex eave-end roof tile features a single-tier lotus design. It is made from fine clay mixed with a small amount of sand and is robust in appearance. The central ovary and petals of the lotus stand out in relief. The rim displays a &ldquo;pearl-dot&rdquo; (<em>yeonju</em> ) motif depicted in intaglio.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p.36]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Roof Tile
676 – 935
Gift of Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp and Museum purchase made possible by Elder and Mrs. Sang-Yong Nam
2004/1.197
A ceramic lid for a matching bowl. Outfitted with a small, round and tapered handle.<br />
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This yellow, low-fired earthenware vessel consists of a body and a lid. It is made from fine clay mixed with a small amount of fine sand particles. Fine, incised horizontal lines run around the body. The gallery that supports the lid rests at a slight incline, and the vessel mouth slopes slightly inwards. The lower part of the body rapidly tapers inwards before joining the base, the center of which is indented. The lid features a low, flat knob. The round, upper part of the lid meets the lip at a slight angle.[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 45]<br />
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Lid for Bowl
400 – 599
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.75B
An instrument consisting of a hollow sound box, a bamboo beck, two pegs in the upper neck wound with strings, two strings, and a bow. The sound box is made of sanyuja wood.<br />
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This is a traditional Korean musical instrument with two strings. Sound is produced by the friction between strings made from several strands of thin silk thread and bowstrings made of horsehair. Its unique sound has earned the haegeum alternative, onomatopoeic names such as gaenggaengi and aenggeum. The instrument consists of a hollow sound box, a bamboo neck, two pegs in the upper neck each wound with a string, the strings themselves, and a separate bow. The pegs are currently detached from the neck. The sound box is made of sanyuja wood (Xylosma congestum).
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 288]</p>
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Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Two-stringed Fiddle (Haegum)
1850 – 1950
Gift and partial purchase from Bruce and Inta Hasenkamp, purchase with funds from Elder and Mrs Sang-Yong Nam
2021/1.159
A pillow-shaped woven basket with a lid used for storing sewing materials. Made of two parts held together by a strip of pine that fits together at the front to seal the basket and its contents.<br />
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These wicker baskets are rimmed with willow strips on both the interior and the exterior. Wicker baskets such as these were used as sewing baskets, food containers, or for other various purposes. The willow strips are sewn firmly together at their joints. On one each side of the lid and body of plate 358 (2009/2.56) is a faded inscription written that reads &ldquo;Seong □ 2-gu Bongsandaek (성□2구 봉산댁; possibly a reference to a lady from Bongsan, living in Seong □ 2 [i]-gu).&rdquo;
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 278]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Lidded Basket for Sewing
1850 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.55
A round and squat kettle made of iron.  It has a tall, arching handle which is tapered at the ends of attachment and the handle on the cover is decorated with cut-outs.
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Iron Kettle
20th century
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.36
A glazed whie and speckled porcelain bottle. The body is round and shperical, with a narrow concave neck and lipped opening.<br />
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These are modern pieces thrown on a semi-manual wheel. Their shoulders are decorated with simple designs in underglaze cobalt blue, which is a result of Japanese influence. The use of clay with a high kaolin content has given the bottles thin walls and a strong sheen. Their shoulders are contaminated with impurities. Objects of this this type were produced in Cheongsong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.207]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bottle
1900 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.63
A glazed whie and speckled porcelain bottle. The body is round with a narrow concave neck and lipped opening. Detailed with a blue curved line and bulb shape.<br />
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These are modern pieces thrown on a semi-manual wheel. Their shoulders are decorated with simple designs in underglaze cobalt blue, which is a result of Japanese influence. The use of clay with a high kaolin content has given the bottles thin walls and a strong sheen. Their shoulders are contaminated with impurities. Objects of this this type were produced in Cheongsong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do.<br />
[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2014) p.207]
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Bottle
1900 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.64
A pillow-shaped woven basket with a lid used for storing sewing materials. Made of two parts, each with a lip of pine. The two pieces are sized differently in order to fit together as a lidded container.<br />
<br />
These wicker baskets are rimmed with willow strips on both the interior and the exterior. Wicker baskets such as these were used as sewing baskets, food containers, or for other various purposes. The willow strips are sewn firmly together at their joints. On one each side of the lid and body of plate 358 (2009/2.56) is a faded inscription written that reads &ldquo;Seong □ 2-gu Bongsandaek (성□2구 봉산댁; possibly a reference to a lady from Bongsan, living in Seong □ 2 [i]-gu).&rdquo;
<p>[Korean Collection, University of Michigan Museum of Art (2017) p. 278]</p>
Korean (Korean (culture or style))
Lidded Basket for Sewing
1850 – 1950
Gift of Ok Ja Chang and the Chang Family
2009/2.56
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