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Results for terms:Ancient Chinese

7 UMMA Objects (page 1/1)
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A deep lobed chalice
Syrian
Lobed Chalice
1100 – 1299
Bequest of Margaret Watson Parker
1948/1.116
A grounded and a flying goose is paired in both paintings, creating a contrast of stillness and movement. The goose is the water has its head turned to watch the descent of the goose flying in from the right. The upper left corner contains calligraphic text, and creating ripples in the water in the foreground is a goose with its head below the surface, and bottom in the air. Reeds come in from the right.<br />
<br />
These two hanging scroll paintings depict geese and reeds. Based on the style, the use of silk and the mounting method, it is assumed that the two works are part of the same set. Plate 278-1 (2009/1.488.1) depicts three geese including one with its head plunged into the water, while Plate 278-2 (2009/1.488.2) depicts two. Both works depict reeds on the right part of the painting. Yang&rsquo;s signature in &ldquo;boneless&rdquo; stroke style, effective in portraying light and shade, is striking. Yang Gihun (楊基薰, 1843&ndash;?), who painted these works, was active mainly in Pyeongyang which is cur
Ki-hun Yang
Geese and Reeds (one of a pair)
1867 – 1899
Gift of Keum Ja and Byung Schick Kang
2009/1.488.1
A grounded and a flying goose is paired in both paintings, creating a contrast of stillness and movement. A goose swoops into the scene from the top left, while the neck of the grounded goose follows a graceful curve to look at the approaching bird. The swaying reeds and grass around the grounded goose add lightness to the composition. Between the two geese are three lines of calligraphy.<br />
<br />
These two hanging scroll paintings depict geese and reeds. Based on the style, the use of silk and the mounting method, it is assumed that the two works are part of the same set. Plate 278-1 (2009/1.488.1) depicts three geese including one with its head plunged into the water, while Plate 278-2 (2009/1.488.2) depicts two. Both works depict reeds on the right part of the painting. Yang&rsquo;s signature in &ldquo;boneless&rdquo; stroke style, effective in portraying light and shade, is striking. Yang Gihun (楊基薰, 1843&ndash;?), who painted these works, was active mainly in Pyeongyang which is currently located i
Ki-hun Yang
Geese and Reeds (two of a pair)
1867 – 1899
Gift of Keum Ja and Byung Schick Kang
2009/1.488.2
Rubbing of limestone slab carved bas-relief with six registers.  The lower register depicts a chariot procession above fish-inhabited waters.  The central three registers depict figures carrying out funerary rites.  The top register shows a winged creature with a human face flanked by two writhing dragons and other animals, including two rabbits and a nine-tailed fox. <br />
Bo Yang
Rubbing of Journey of the Soul to the Paradise of the Queen Mother of the West (2000/2.1) - Front
2008
Museum purchase made possible by the Katherine Tuck Enrichment Fund
2008/1.154.1
This photograph shows a view of stairs, doors, and banisters within the Imperial Palace in Beijing, China.
Eliot Porter (American (North American))
Imperial Palace, Peking
1980
Gift of Clayton E. Wilhite
1987/1.252.2
This photograph depicts a forested scene with two large, stone animals occupying the center of the frame.
Eliot Porter (American (North American))
The Kong Forest
1980
Gift of Clayton E. Wilhite
1987/1.252.3
Limestone slab carved bas-relief with six registers. The lower register depicts a chariot procession above fish-inhabited waters. The central three registers depict figures carrying out funerary rites. The top register shows a winged creature with a human face flanked by two writhing dragons and other animals, including two rabbits and a nine-tailed fox.
Chinese (Chinese (culture or style))
Journey of the Soul to the Paradise of the Queen Mother of the West
2nd century
Museum purchase made possible by the Friends of the Museum of Art and the Margaret Watson Parker Art Collection Fund, in honor of Senior Curator Marshall Wu on his retirement
2000/2.1
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